Animals Merit Our Moral Consideration

The vast majority of cows are confined to unsanitary feed lots, deprived of room to roam and the ability to graze, and fed an unnatural mixture of corn and antibiotics.

Going Meat-Free Is Delicious

Seitan "beef" stew is one of the many tasty and healthy recipes on our site. (Photo and recipe courtesy of JVNA supporter and vegan cooking star Isa Chandra Moskowitz and her Post Punk Kitchen.)

Your Nutrition Questions Answered

Where do vegan and vegetarians get their protein? What about iron? Calcium? Vitamins D and B12? JVNA addresses all of these important issues on our nutrition page

Please Help Us Create a More Compassionate Judaism

Please help us save the soul of Judaism with your tax-deductible membership donation. Your donation will be automatically doubled by a matching grant and will support our many plant-based programs. It takes just a minute to donate online by clicking on the image above. Donations also accepted by checks payable to Jewish Veg, 9 Hawthorne Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15221.

Jewish Veg + VeggieConnection = The Perfect Match

Jewish Veg is proud to partner with, the site where vegans connect. Sign up today through this link to start meeting Jewish veg singles.

Take the Jewish Veg Pledge

From burgers to brisket, we can help you discover easy-to-make and enjoyable vegan alternatives. We'll send you resources, recipes, tips -- and, soon, the first-ever Jewish-themed Veg Starter Guide! Sign up at

Photo: net_efekt / Foter / CC BY


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After 40 Years, a New Name for a Transformed Organization

In a surprise announcement made at our 40th Anniversary Celebration in New York on Oct. 13, we rebranded ourselves as Jewish Veg, after we were known for 40 years as Jewish Vegetarians of North America.
Executive Director Jeffrey Cohan made the announcement at a celebratory fund-raising dinner held at Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion. 
The name change, Cohan explained, was based on numerous considerations, including: 
Using the word “Vegetarians” in our name created some confusion, as our mission is to encourage and help people to reduce their consumption of all types of animal products, with veganism as the ultimate objective. 
The word “Veg” encompasses vegans and vegetarians alike, furthering our objective of being an inclusive organization.
The word “Veg” has a contemporary and positive connotation. 
“The changing of our name is the latest step in the dramatic transformation of this organization,” Cohan told the audience. 
For 38 of our 40 years, we were an all-volunteer organization. Over the last two years, the organization has added professional staff, built a strong Board of Directors, and assembled impressive Rabbinic and Advisory councils.
More importantly, Jewish Veg has greatly expanded its capacity and impact, creating a “Veg Pledge” campaign to help people adopt plant-based diets, forging partnerships with prominent Jewish organizations, and making numerous presentations in Jewish venues around the country, among other initiatives.
In fact, also at Tuesday night’s event, Jewish Veg announced that it is partnering with Hillel International to send Israeli vegan leader Ori Shavit to 10 college campuses across the country to speak to Jewish students this month and next.
Our mission is to encourage and help people to embrace plant-based diets as an expression of the Jewish values of compassion for animals, concern for health, and care for the environment. We are the organization working to uphold Judaism’s highest ideals. 



Author of "The Perfect Formula Diet" 

The Jewish Veg Spotlight Shines On ... Janice Stanger, Ph.D.

Should we avoid soy? Is there any reason to consume fish oil for its Omega-3s? Does calcium really build strong bones?

For answers to these common questions and others, we turned to JVNA member Janice Stanger, Ph.D., a respected expert on the science of nutrition – and a debunker of nutrition myths. 

Read the Veg Spotlight